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On this Eve of Christmas I discovered a gift which was before me for, it appears, many years. It was on the paduaprep.com website under the Gallery.

 

I used to check the Gallery from time to time to see if there were any new photo postings. For some reason I guess I had not been regular in my checking, or the alumni must have furtively posted them at various times. In any event I was quite surprised to see how many photos have been posted. It warmed my heart, indeed.

 

If other alumni have not discovered these photos it would be worth your time to check them out. Also, if you could add details to any of the photos, it would help others to enjoy them more fully.

 

Wishing all the best at this special time of year!

 

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This is great investigative work that Tony Specian did on the two photos of my previous Posts (Outlook Point & Rocky and Happy). I would not have ventured to guess that they were so intimately related.

 

That being so, I accept Tony’s conclusions as fact, and will add my own observations which were stimulated by his Post.  Namely, look at the gestalt of the two photos: they are synchronous as overall form and view, especially of the lay of the land. Specifically, note the shadow on the grass (noted by the red arrow) and note the apparently  similar forms indicated by the green arrows. The curvature of the hill which drops off to the right in both photos. This is strong convergence to lead one to state that this is the same place of the two photos. Continue reading Common Ground

 

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The locations of Chad’s previous 2 photo’s from the grounds peaked my interest.  My first observations were from memory.  I was able to find a photo taken from my dorm room during the 1965-66 school year. It was taken from the upper floor dorm room somewhere in the vacinity above the Rectors office and entrance to the Chapel.  The upper right photo was taken on the grounds this past August 2012 about where the front Porch was situated.  The red arrow in three of the pictures is a strong reference point.  The ? red arrow in the Rocky Photo looks to be the same possible reference point in the other three Photo’s. Compensate for the camera angle.  Chad’s two photo’s may have been on the South side of the main building, keep in mind  there is no date for the Rocky Photo.

 

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To follow up on back photos of people enjoying the panorama of the Seneca Lake Valley from the Padua Campus, I offer this one. The photograph is compliments of The Odessa File (http://www.odessafile.com/history-kelly.html) with this caption, “Then-Governor Nelson Rockefeller and his wife Happy at an overlook near Watkins Glen.” To us who had spent many waking hours during our teens observing this very view, it can be none other than the grounds of Padua. Correct me if I am wrong.

 

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As you may recognize this photo as the main image chosen for this Blog’s front page, you may or may not know that this place was apparently well known at one time. I, for one, never knew that this place was called “Outlook Point.”

 

I am posting it here to see if others know any history about this particular spot on the ranging acres that was once the Paduan Campus.

 

From what information I have about this particular photo, it was noted to contain Father Gerard Piotrowski (left) and Father Donald Bilinski (right). Fr. Donald I can recognize even from the back, since he had thick black hair. I knew Fr. Donald well and did some work for him. Fr. Gerard I did not know, but I did find some brief mention of him being Apostolic Minister to Siberia (Gerard Piotrowski).

 

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Again I am drawn to think and feel about themes I thought were long resolved and over-meditated (if there is a word like that). But the movement of the soul has thought otherwise.

 

Dialectics have fascinated me all my adult life, and in many ways that could be a thumbnail of what life is for me— a creative balance and interplay of opposites. Artistically in recent years this has revealed itself to me in, of all things, the color gradient or its black and white counterpart, the grayscale gradient. Other examples of it are most common in how we as humans think and feel. For every “beginning” there is an “end.” For every “presence”, an “absence.”   Continue reading An Absence